A lot of people think if you’re living in one of the cheapest places in the world, you’re probably not living that well.

And that couldn’t be further from the truth. The cheapest countries to live in are often some of the best places to call home—in the world!

How do I know? Well, I’ve lived in some of these countries and I’d live there again in a heartbeat. A few others on the list, they are high on my radar and I WILL call them my temporary home one day.

I hope this list helps some of you decide on places in the world where you can call home and not shell out every last cent to your name. Because life doesn’t have to be too expensive, even if you’re thousands of miles from where you’re from…

31 of the Cheapest Places to Live in the World


Things to know about the data below:

  • A lot of this info was gathered from Numbeo.com, it has a pretty decent estimate of costs! We also compared through further research from those who live there.
  • The groceries are basic, it’s eggs, meat, fruit, veg, starches, etc all added up and times by four weeks.
  • The entertainment section includes eating out a couple of times a month at a cheap spot and a couple of coffees.
  • Rent is the average price of renting in the city and outside of the city.
  • Transport is on average what a monthly transport pass in a city would cost.
Phnom Penh market Cambodia

Plenty of opportunities to spend your $$

A few things to keep in mind when thinking about the cheapest places to live in the world:

  • The numbers below are just averages and were found through tons of hours of research.
  • Keep in mind visa issues! If you’re American like me, I linked and mentioned the visa requirements.
  • “Live” is a term I’m using loosely here. I usually “live” places for around 2-3 months, more often than not because that’s all a visa will allow for. If you’re looking for a place to lay low for a few months, you can “live” in any of these countries!
  • Remember that this post is to LIVE in these places, not travel around the entire country, that would cost a lot more. If you’re looking for how much it would be to TRAVEL these countries, this isn’t the right post but I’ve listed some articles under each country with more info on traveling and costs.
  • The numbers here are pretty basic, it’s to get your wheels turning, it’s to give you a number to work with, I don’t know how you like living, so of course, things can cost more or less than what’s below. 
  • These totals don’t include fancy nights out, excessive drinking, visa costs, clothing needs, toiletries costs, or any of those “little” things. We’re talking shelter, food, a bit of transport, and like, a few coffees.
  • I listed the country below, not the cities… Do understand that these numbers reflect the average of the country but certain cities may be WAY more expensive (or cheap!). An example would be Portugal, Lisbon is getting pretty pricey! But some of the cute smaller towns are far more reasonable.
  • The numbers will also differ if you’re solo or not. If rent stated below is split two ways, you can come out spending less than $1k each. Solo travelers may go over the $1k budget here and there depending.
  • EVERYONE LIVES DIFFERENTLY, so yeah, let’s just say this again, the numbers are for you to think about, they are not set in stone. If you need 7 beers a night and eat out 5 times out of the week, you’ll be spending a lot more. If you are fine with roommates since you’re solo, eat Ramen every night and don’t drink, you can spend much less. It all depends!

The Cheapest Places to Live in The Caribbean

Ah! The Caribbean islands. Who wouldn’t want to chill and hang out on a warm Caribbean island for the rest of their lives? The thing about island life, though, is that quite often you have to either live a very basic life or you have to have a lot of money. There’s not much in between. There are, of course, always exceptions.

Grenada

Of all the Caribbean islands, this is one of the least visited by tourists, likely because of the rarity of large and glamorous resorts. But that’s what makes it great! It’s just a chill island that grows a lot of its own food resources, so the food is fresh, awesome, and cheap. Settle in or near Grand Anse Beach or St. George’s, the major city centers, and you’ll be set with all the creature comforts you need to live a lovely island life where English is the national language, crime is low, and Americans are welcomed.

Caribbean island Grenada

Grenada

  • Rent and Utilities: $500
  • Groceries: $200
  • Transportation: $80
  • Entertainment: $100
  • Monthly Budget: $880
  • Visa Situation: US citizens do not need a visa to enter Grenada and stay for up to 90 days, but you must have proof of departure.

The Cheapest Places to Live in Latin America

If you’re from the United States, especially if you live in a state that has a large Spanish speaking population, like California or Florida, a country in Latin America might feel like a dream to you. You may have always wanted to dig into the cultures and civilizations of the Latin American world. Fortunately, for very little money, you can not only do that, but you can do it in style. And you don’t even have to fly halfway across the world to do it!

Mexico

More than one million US citizens currently live in Mexico. Many are retirees looking to get more bang out of their pension. Many are digital nomads who can stretch their online income.

Still, others have found ways to link into the Mexican job system and economy, teaching English, working for American corporations, you name it. The dollar goes a long way here. Mexico is probably one of the easiest countries to relocate to as it is the closest, and it is super American friendly. It is also a giant country with dozens of gorgeous colonial towns and stunning beaches.

Check out Tulum in the Riviera Maya or San Miguel de Allende for the quaint yet cosmopolitan. Don’t be surprised when you run into handfuls of fellow American expats.

Even in Mexico City, the Airbnb we rented was in the happening Roma Norte area and was under $600 for the month! Guys, that leaves you with a $400 taco budget… What more do you want?

Safety Precaution: Avoid border towns where you could encounter smuggling, corruption and the high crime typical of any area with a large income inequality problem.

How to spend 3 days in Mexico City.

Mexico City

  • Rent and Utilities: $350
  • Groceries: $180
  • Transportation: $20
  • Entertainment: $100
  • Monthly Budget: $650
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter Mexico and can stay for up to 180 days.

Colombia

Like Mexico, Colombia can get a bad rap but for the most part, Colombia is simply a beautiful, welcoming, geographically diverse country. And it has a growing population of American retirees and expats. You could stay in Medellin, in the mountains, or in Cartagena on the beach. It’s best to avoid Bogota, though, the city’s capital, if you want to try to live on the cheap.

Salento Quindio Colombia

Salento Quindio Colombia

  • Rent and Utilities: $350
  • Groceries: $180
  • Transportation: $30
  • Entertainment: $75
  • Monthly Budget: $640
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter Colombia and can stay for up to 90 days. 

Chile

Chile is the first world wonder of Latin America. Low corruption, a strong economy, and a happy, healthy population in general. It also has four seasons and an old world feel with new world accommodations like fast internet and far-reaching mobile service. And, it’s almost all beach!

The entirety of Chile runs along the Southern Pacific Ocean. Obviously, for all of this, you’ll pay a little bit more, and even more than a little bit in the big city of Santiago, but you can still live a totally awesome lifestyle in the outskirts of the metropolitan areas and ride into town using the great public transportation system.

Torres del Paine National Park Chile

Torres del Paine National Park

  • Rent and Utilities: $600
  • Groceries: $200
  • Transportation: $50
  • Entertainment: $100
  • Monthly Budget: $950
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter Chile and can stay for up to 90 days. 

Ecuador

High quality of life and low cost of living in a Latin American country with relatively low crime rates and a small town feel? Just a four-hour plane ride from Miami? Sign me up! There’s also a nice healthy expat community, internet cafes in abundance, and a wide variety of rich and delicious food. 

  • Rent and Utilities: $425
  • Groceries: $180
  • Transportation: $15
  • Entertainment: $60
  • Monthly Budget: $680
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter Ecuador and can stay for up to 90 days. 

Peru

Neighbor to Chile, Peru will offer you sky scraping mountains, warm windswept beaches, and walkable metropolitan cities. It’s modern, it’s lively, and it’s steeped in history.

And on top of it all, it’s super laid back and affordable. This is the place to throw on your tank top and your flip flops, strap on your backpack and just spend your time wandering.

Panorama of Miraflores Playas de la Costa Verde Cercado de Lima Peru

Panorama of Miraflores Playas de la Costa

  • Rent and Utilities: $400
  • Groceries: $180
  • Transportation: $30
  • Entertainment: $70
  • Monthly Budget: $680
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens are approved for a time up to 180 days upon entry. Extensions are not typically granted.

Panama

So close to home at the very southern tip of Central America! Panama is set on the stunning Caribbean Sea, is a small, safe, stable country, and it welcomes not only the US dollar but also US expats.

It has a growing US expat community of over 25,000. You’ll find plenty of warm and welcoming locals as well as fellow world travelers and digital nomads, looking for the good life without losing all your dollars.

  • Rent and Utilities: $700
  • Groceries: $190
  • Transportation: $25
  • Entertainment: $75
  • Monthly Budget: $990
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter Panama and stay for up to 180 days.

Costa Rica

The Switzerland of Latin America, Costa Rica is a peace-loving, stable, still developing country in Central America. It’s beautiful, it’s fun, it has a huge expat community, and it is definitely on the higher end of the $1000 list here, for a good reason. This is one of those times that “you get what you pay for” is certainly true.

Be prepared for a way laid back, slowed down life here filled with tropical animals, tropical bugs, and world-class beaches and restaurants. If that sounds like your cup of cafe, drink up.

Irazu Volcano Costa Rica

Irazu Volcano

  • Rent and Utilities: $600
  • Groceries: $200
  • Transportation: $40
  • Entertainment: $75
  • Monthly Budget: $915
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter Costa Rica and stay for up to 90 days. Be sure to have a return ticket.

The Cheapest Places to Live in Europe

Georgia

The hidden gem of Europe, recently hitting The Lonely Planet’s top ten list of countries not to be missed, Georgia is up and coming on the tourist and expat radar.

It’s falling apart in some places and flagrantly beautiful in others, with entire murals dedicated to art and gigantic innovative structures going up all the time. It is a progressive yet quaint country with fast internet and safe streets.

Tbilisi Georgia Sunset

Sunset in Tbilisi

  • Rent and Utilities: $300
  • Groceries: $170
  • Transportation: $15
  • Entertainment: $50
  • Monthly Budget: $535
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter Georgia and stay for up to 365 days.

Bulgaria

If you’re looking for a magnificent European country that has managed to hold fast to its own, non-Western, traditions and culture, Bulgaria is the place for you.

A laid back, very affordable Balkan nation with a huge population of expats from the UK, Bulgaria is rich in its diversity of people while also staying true to its roots. You could prop yourself up on your digital nomad income either on the beautiful black sea beaches or in the busy city of Sofia, further inland.

Seven Rila lakes Bulgaria

Seven Rila lakes

  • Rent and Utilities: $375
  • Groceries: $190
  • Transportation: $30
  • Entertainment: $50
  • Monthly Budget: $645
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter Bulgaria and stay for up to 90 days.

Croatia

With stunning palaces, Gothic churches, beaches on the Mediterranean, and so much more, Croatia is being dubbed “The New Tuscany” by many who are buying luxury properties in the country.

One-Week Road Trip Croatia Itinerary, 7 days in croatia, one week croatia, croatia itinerary for 7 days, pula croatia

Pula, Croatia

Yet because it is still a fairly new and developing country, having just gained its independence in 1991, it remains affordable and expat friendly. You’ll feel right at home if you love the sun and abundant nature as well as a wealth of art and music festivals. Very much for the Bohemian minded among us.

One-Week Road Trip Croatia Itinerary, 7 days in croatia, one week croatia, croatia itinerary for 7 days, makarska croatia

Croatian sunsets don’t disappoint

  • Rent and Utilities: $550
  • Groceries: $200
  • Transportation: $50
  • Entertainment: $75
  • Monthly Budget: $875
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter Croatia and stay for up to 90 days.

Greece

I don’t actually have to give you a list of reasons to live in Greece for a bit, do I? I mean aside from the islands, the beaches, the nightlife, the culture, the ancient history (it is, after all, the seat of Western Civilization), and so much more, it’s also super chill, it’s safe, and the food is freaking awesome. There, I gave you the list after all.

Santorini Greece architecture

Santorini

  • Rent and Utilities: $550
  • Groceries: $200
  • Transportation: $35
  • Entertainment: $100
  • Monthly Budget: $885
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter Greece and stay for up to 90 days.

Portugal

A rich, vibrant culture, with walkable, albeit hilly, city streets, Portugal is easily the most affordable and fun loving city in Europe proper. It also has a wide variety of expatriates from other countries, so you’ll find lots of English spilling out into the streets, and a nightlife that will keep you as entertained as you want to be.

You get beaches and colonial towns, history and culture, and, of course, food! So much good fresh food. If living in Europe affordably with a busy international airport nearby is a priority for you, Portugal is your next home.

The best Algarve Beaches of Portugal

Sagres AKA the End of the World

This is one of my favorite cheap countries to live in. Garrett and I are partial to Sagres, a small and quiet surf town. We’ve lived here numerous times and we actually spent very little!

Our Airbnb was a shared house (something we usually don’t do but an “entire home” is much more expensive here), and our host is now one of our best friends AND she had two dogs for me to cuddle with every night, so this place was a winner for me already.

Take into account we only paid $550 for five weeks of accommodation, were 10 minutes from three beaches, our rental car only cost us $200 for a month, we ate VERY well, and of course, got doggie cuddle every night—Yeah, we love it here!

Carvoeiro beach in Algarve

Carvoeiro beach

  • Rent and Utilities: $675
  • Groceries: $150
  • Transportation: $40
  • Entertainment: $100
  • Monthly Budget: $965
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter Portugal and stay for up to 90 days.

Albania

Very few people realize that Albania is a country on the Mediterranean Sea, just across the Adriatic from Italy, and cozied up to Greece, filled with glorious beaches and a thriving nightlife in the bustling city of Tirana.

And it’s comparable to most of the Asian countries in affordability. Albania is also at the top of the charts for friendliness and warmth. On the list of European countries to stop and stay awhile, Albania is a must.

Ksamil Albania

Ksamil

  • Rent and Utilities: $325
  • Groceries: $170
  • Transportation: $15
  • Entertainment: $50
  • Monthly Budget: $560
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter Albania and stay for up to 365 days.

Czech Republic

The Czech Republic is one of those terribly underappreciated European countries that gets left as an afterthought for many tourists and expats. Which can be to your benefit!

This low key, laid back, super accepting country remains relatively low in terms of cost of living while still being a hip and modern, forward-thinking, developed country. So “Czech” it out!

Czech Republic places to visit surrounding Prague Castle.

An ancient symbol of the Czech State!

  • Rent and Utilities: $650
  • Groceries: $150
  • Transportation: $25
  • Entertainment: $75
  • Monthly Budget: $900
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter the Czech Republic and stay for up to 90 days.

Romania

In far Eastern Europe, situated on the Black Sea, just south of Ukraine, you’ll find the broad sweeping landscape of wild outdoors and ancient temples and castles of Romania.

The people are friendly, the food and wine are cheap, and the internet is fast. It is a digital nomad paradise. You can hike up into the deep dark woods of Transylvania or bask in the sun on the shimmering sea. Or both.

Sibiu town - A cute town to visit as a thing to do in Transylvania

Sibiu, Romania

  • Rent and Utilities: $400
  • Groceries: $180
  • Transportation: $20
  • Entertainment: $75
  • Monthly Budget: $675
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter Romania and stay for up to 90 days. 

Montenegro

A new favorite spot for expats, Montenegro is new on the list of independent countries. Since its departure from Serbia just a little over a decade ago, Montenegro has really come into its own.

Foreigners are buying up beachfront real estate on the Adriatic Sea, and tourists are hitting the slopes on the lovely mountains inland. You’ll have all the comforts of a modernized, developed region, with the freshness of a brand new country.

I paid only $22 a night for a sea view apartment for myself in Ulcinj… (remember, it would have been cheaper if I stayed a full month!)

A seafood feast with a glass of wine on the water was only $10…

I love you Montenegro!

incredible photos of montenegro what to do in montenegro 122

Kotor

  • Rent and Utilities: $425
  • Groceries: $170
  • Transportation: $35
  • Entertainment: $75
  • Monthly Budget: $705
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter Montenegro and stay for up to 90 days.

Poland

For many expats and digital nomads wandering the earth, Poland is a draw for its Slavic roots. It has really long winters, up to six months sometimes, and super small accommodations, but the people are friendly, the cities are thriving, and the cost of living is affordable by European standards.

If you’re interested in this particular region of Europe, it could be a great starting point as you make your way to your through the much more expensive places like France and England and on to your next affordable living quarters in Portugal, Greece, or even Morocco.

Stare Miasto Warsaw Poland

Stare Miasto, Warsaw

  • Rent and Utilities: $550
  • Groceries: $190
  • Transportation: $25
  • Entertainment: $75
  • Monthly Budget: $840
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter Poland and stay for up to 90 days. 

The Cheapest Places to Live in Asia

So far, we’ve covered countries and cultures that are likely either close to your own, from the western world, or at least perhaps familiar, as Latin America is home to our neighboring countries. Asia, on the other hand, is a whole world and culture away. Living in Asia is both a delight and a trial as you’ll be learning to navigate a vastly distinct culture and language from your own.

All of which will present amazing experiences and long-lasting memories. I will never be able to describe the wonder and the beauty that takes up so much of the space in Asian countries. So you’ll have to start checking these countries off your own list and see for yourself.

Indonesia

Islands, islands, islands! Thousands of islands make up Indonesia, and Bali is just one of them. From jungles to rice fields to volcanoes to mountain tops.

backpacking Indonesia

Bromo

You will never run out of things to see and do in Indonesia, and you will do it among some of the most friendly and welcoming people in the world. Indonesia certainly makes the top of the affordable Asian countries list.

I don’t know how many times I’ve visited Indonesia (and I’m not just talking about Bali!), I love it so much. I’ve stayed in shit hotel rooms for $5 with a million dollar ocean view and surf just outside my doorway and I’ve stayed in jungle huts for just $7 a night with fresh breakfasts that can feed a small army for $3…

Kelingking beach Nusa Penida indonesia

Kelingking beach on Nusa Penida

  • Rent and Utilities: $330
  • Groceries: $130
  • Transportation: $15
  • Entertainment: $40
  • Monthly Budget: $515
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens can get a tourist stamp for free for just 30 days with no possibility of extension.

Thailand

So, if you’ve read anything else I’ve ever written, you probably already know how much I love Thailand. I have spent several years of my life here, working, living, traveling, you name it.

It is a beautiful, tropical climate, with warm, welcoming people, and the cost of living is super affordable. It is also home to a thriving expat community and a major hub for traveling to other countries, Asian and otherwise. It’s a win, win, win.

Lived here for years and loved it. I had my own jungle home for $120 a month and a nice apartment for $200… Local food is $1-$3. What else do you want for a cheap country to live in?

And to show what skimping by really looks like… I once lived on $10a day in Chiang Mai when I was SUPER broke because I had just started teaching online and my first paycheck didn’t come for 6 weeks! I had a simple hotel room and I still ate my three meals a day. I paid $5 for the room and $5 on food.

krabi island tours

Thailand beach

  • Rent and Utilities: $350
  • Groceries: $180
  • Transportation: $30
  • Entertainment: $50
  • Monthly Budget: $610
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter Thailand and stay for up to 30 days.

India

India is one of those mysterious, lovely, chaotic, and wildly different environments that is worth settling into for a while to really experience it. The lifestyles range from modern, bright and colorful, to rigidly conservative and unforgiving of trespasses.

All in all, it is worth a long term stay for a traveling expat to see for him or herself. And because it’s so affordable to stay, it certainly can’t hurt.

6 Days Golden Triangle Itinerary: India For Beginners

India

China

Easily one of the most rapidly advancing countries in the entire world, China is home to millions upon millions of people either hustling and bustling in big city centers or living the more comfortable and reserved life in the countryside.

Either way you go, you can’t go wrong. It is a country filled with beautiful landscapes, amazing food, and a diverse population of people. It’s super cheap to live here for such a modernized, industrialized country, and you still get most of the modern conveniences you expect in America, you know, like Starbucks.

Great Wall of China without crowds or tours

Great Wall of China

  • Rent and Utilities: $450
  • Groceries: $150
  • Transportation: $20
  • Entertainment: $75
  • Monthly Budget: $695
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens can apply for a 10-year multiple entry visa for repeated trips to China, Hong Kong, or Macau. You must apply in advance.

Malaysia

Can you say beautiful beaches, best friends, and bountiful food? Well, that’s Malaysia. You can post up in a beach town with fast wifi and instant friends pretty much anywhere in Malaysia and be happy.

It’s summertime practically all year round, and the infrastructure continues to improve as more expats and tourists are discovering this tropical paradise. You can’t go wrong dropping anchor here for a few months. Just don’t plan your stay for monsoon season.

The islands like the Perhentians can get a bit pricey but overall, Malaysia is a pretty cheap place to live in! Willing to pay a few extra bucks? My friend rented a sick condo with a rooftop pool, overlooking the city for around $700 a month—If you eat cheap, which isn’t hard to do here, you can still come in under $1k!

petronas tower kuala-lumpur

Petronas tower, Kuala Lumpur

  • Rent and Utilities: $400
  • Groceries: $190
  • Transportation: $25
  • Entertainment: $50
  • Monthly Budget: $665
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter Malaysia and stay for up to 90 days. 

Philippines

Drop dead cheap living in one of the most beautiful places in the world, where almost everyone also speaks English? What could go wrong? Not much. After all, you could spend your days on the beach and munch away on delicious food.

Star beach El Nido Philippines

You can hike up volcanoes and hit up an incredibly high functioning and widespread public transportation system. I mean, I’m sure there’s a downside to life in the Philippines, but I’m hard-pressed to figure out what it is.

It’s pretty damn cheap here, the most expensive thing is actually the moving around since there are so many buses, boats, planes and taxis that are needed to get anywhere across the 7,000+ islands. however, if you’re just staying put and trying to live in a cheap country, the Philippines is it!

DISCLAIMER: The wifi is shit, so digital nomads, this isn’t a good country to work in, unfortunately. Speaking from experience.

Philippines Palawan lagoon

Palawan

  • Rent and Utilities: $400
  • Groceries: $170
  • Transportation: $10
  • Entertainment: $50
  • Monthly Budget: $630
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not need a visa to enter the Philippines and stay for up to 30 days. 

Vietnam

Vietnam is small enough to travel and explore in manageable chunks, but also busy and cosmopolitan enough to stay active in a social scene if you want to. It is a country steeped in history that goes back centuries, with wildly diverse cities like Hanoi and serenely beautiful countryside.

Also: lots of waterfalls! Come to Vietnam for the culture, for the food, for the festivals, and for the climate. It is almost always nice here.

Vietnam itinerary

Vietnam

  • Rent and Utilities: $350
  • Groceries: $150
  • Transportation: $10
  • Entertainment: $50
  • Monthly Budget: $560
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens can get an E Visa prior to arrival in Vietnam for stays up to 30 days.

Turkey

Why don’t more people talk about Turkey!? It is basically an Asian Greece. Right across the Mediterranean, Turkish beaches are remarkable, and the Turkish coffee is to die for. It is a country rich in history and in culture, with a killer food scene and a diverse population of people from all backgrounds.

It is quaint in some small villages, wild and untamed in its mountains, and highly advanced and innovative in its cities like Istanbul. Add to all that its affordability and of course it’s on this list.

  • Rent and Utilities: $300
  • Groceries: $160
  • Transportation: $35
  • Entertainment: $50
  • Monthly Budget: $545
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens can get an E Visa prior to arrival for a stay up to 90 days.

Cambodia

There’s never a dull moment in this small country with a tragic history and a big bright future. You’ll be reminded of the horrors of Siem Reap and humbled by the beauty of Angkor Wat.

The expat community is growing almost as rapidly as the infrastructure here, which is reflective of one really clear point: there is simply something special about Cambodia. Sure, it is tropical, lovely, laid back, and welcoming, but there’s something still deeper, something that’s got real heart in Cambodia. I suppose you’ll have to head over for a bit and see for yourself.

Backpacking Cambodia

Cambodia

  • Rent and Utilities: $400
  • Groceries: $105
  • Transportation: $25
  • Entertainment: $50
  • Monthly Budget: $580
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens may enter Cambodia on a tourist visa for a stay up to 30 days.

Nepal

Talk about slowing waaaay down, that’s exactly what you’ll be doing in Nepal. You’ll encounter a way of life vastly different from that of most of the world. People come from all over to base camp at Mount Everest, so you’ll run across a wide variety of cultures, but the lifestyle is all the same.

Chill. No rush. It is at once humbling, eye-opening, and dirt cheap.

How to Go Trekking in Nepal and What NOT to Do - Poon Hill Trek

Nepal

  • Rent and Utilities: $170
  • Groceries: $120
  • Transportation: $10
  • Entertainment: $40
  • Monthly Budget: $340
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens may obtain a tourist visa upon arrival for 15 days for a fee of $25, 30 days for $40, or 90 days for $100.

Laos

Quite often overlooked, Laos is the little sister to Thailand, Vietnam, and Cambodia. It is definitely worth taking a look, though. With gorgeous landscapes, wonderful and affordable accommodations, and some expat networking opportunities, a few months here could be just the break you need from all your busy travels.

And a break is what you’ll get. You won’t have a lot of access to high-speed internet, and the rest of Laotian life is also pretty slow. So expect to take a month or two or three to just chill, enjoy the scenery, and eat delicious food.

Laos view

Laos is gorgeous and cheap

  • Rent and Utilities: $550
  • Groceries: $150
  • Transportation: $5
  • Entertainment: $50
  • Monthly Budget: $755
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens may obtain a visa on arrival for a stay up to 30 days. 

The Cheapest Places to Live in Africa

Morocco

Why move to Morocco? Hello?! It’s one of the most visually and sensory stunning locations on the globe, with wildly untamed sand dunes and crashing surf and sea, all contained in an ancient country with thousands of years of history in its walls.

A stay in Morocco is an opportunity to live among a modern Muslim population that is welcoming to western visitors, a chance to check your privilege at the border, and an opportunity to practice your French! It’s hot, it’s muggy, and the bells toll constantly for prayer, but it’s also dreamy, romantic, and exotic in ways that few other countries are.

We paid $470 for five weeks in a great apartment with ocean view and the surf just a few minutes walking distance away… Oh, and our surfboard and wetsuit rentals were only $7 per person for the entire day!

Mirleft sunset at Spanish Fort

Spanish Fort in Mirleft

  • Rent and Utilities: $450
  • Groceries: $170
  • Transportation: $15
  • Entertainment: $50
  • Monthly Budget: $685
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens do not require a visa for entry or stay up to 90 days.

Egypt

This feels like another one of those places I don’t really need to describe to you. Right? The Nile river, the pyramids, the bazars, the history… I mean, it’s kind of a no brainer.

Egypt is one of the most ancient cities in the world, which can also lay claim to having been run by a magnificently powerful queen (I’m looking at you, Cleopatra!). If Africa is on your list, you must come to Egypt.

Karmak temple Egypt

Karmak temple

  • Rent and Utilities: $200
  • Groceries: $120
  • Transportation: $10
  • Entertainment: $40
  • Monthly Budget: $370
  • Visa Situation: US Citizens must obtain an E Visa for entry and stay up to 30 days in Egypt. 

Cheapest Countries to Live: Other Parts of the World

A note on this list: of course, you can “survive” on under $1000 in many other parts of the world, including the most expensive places to live, like London or Paris.

But the point here is not how to survive on under $1000, it is how to make a good life as someone who wants to see the world, so some of these cheaper countries to live in are a great start since you can live for cheaper a bit easier.

Work and traveling to New Zealand

We even did pretty well living in pricey New Zealand for a decent price!

Did you know Garrett and I lived in Australia, yes, one of the most expensive countries in the world, for less than $1k each? I didn’t include it on this list because I do understand this may be a bit extreme for some, but we did it!

In these countries, you’ll have a decent way of life, and if you’re a digital nomad, that is, you’ve figured out a way to make money from your laptop, you can still save a chunk of money while also enjoying a new country, in a nice apartment, with plenty of adventure around you to keep you busy.

Tips on Keep Costs Down in The Cheapest Countries to Live In

OK fine, you can use these tips in any country really!

  • I book Airbnbs out for a month. I often get a significant discount for doing this. Also, Airbnbs often come with a kitchen which helps me keep costs down. Here’s an Airbnb discount code to get you started plus some more tips!
  • I also find places to stay for a month by asking locals and walking around. You can find SUPER cheap places this way too.
  • Like mentioned above, I love to cook, I cook to keep costs down. Breakfast is one of the ultimate wallet savers! Instead of shelling out $5-$15 every morning, I COOK. Eggs and toast can be made by a monkey and costs a couple of bucks at most to make at home.
  • I walk! Luckily, pretty much every place listed has towns and cities that are walkable. Use those legs! Also, if public transport is cheap, use it! Taxis can be rip-offs and use them only if you need to.
  • When thinking about the cheapest countries to live in, think about how a regular person lives and live like that. A regular person doesn’t travel 50% of the month, a regular person doesn’t eat out every day, and they surely don’t drink every night either. This is NOT a vacation, this is you LIVING in another country. This “I’m not on vacation, I’m living a normal life” mindset will help you keep costs down.
  • If you want the cheapest place to live in the world to be your new home, make it happen! Cut down on any costs possible, buy that ticket and just go!

Oh and don’t forget to bring some extra cash for fun. I hope nobody is thinking, “what the hell is this girl thinking?! I want to live in the cheapest places in the world because I want to experience them! This list is shit.”

This isn’t the point, the point of this post is to show you the cheapest countries to live in, how much you need to literally have shelter, get around, eat, and maybe have a few beers… Just “normal life” stuff.

vancouver day trips tours

Just living a normal life abroad, guys!

If you can keep living costs under $1k, imagine what you could do with $2k a month? And $2k a month is a pretty decent budget! An extra $1k can buy you a rental car for the month, a few fancy dinners, some cool excursions, maybe some souvenirs for your friends and family (JK, spend it all on yourself.), and whatever else you want.

I have a feeling I’m going to get some people here denying the numbers, saying this is impossible, this isn’t “living” this is barely surviving, and overall being super negative. Hey, not everything is for everyone. But I’m here to tell you it’s possible to live in these places for less than $1k. Will you be getting massages every day, getting fanned with a palm frond, and eating lobster every day? Hell no.

But you’ll LIVE. Like a regular person, which is what these numbers are for. Just a regular person life…Which is what I do when I’m abroad more than half of the time anyway. It may seem like I’m always traveling but I’m not! I’m just trying to live my regular life but in another country. 🙂

Take this info, let the wheels turn, and figure out the cheapest countries to live in that are on the top of your list. Save money, maybe work abroad or remotely, travel, enjoy life, have fun!

Which of these cheapest countries to live in is calling your name? Let us know in the comments!



>>> Read More! <<<

Becoming A Digital Nomad: Realities & Resources

21+ Digital Nomad Jobs: Take Your Desk Around The World

Can You Teach English Online/Abroad Without a Degree?

7 Steps on How to Become a Travel Videographer + Tips

How to Start Making Money with Travel Photography



 

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